Into Tibetan Lands

The Himalayan foothills are turning vertical and Zippy’s long wheelbase and weight¬†is making it difficult to hold a straight line, especially when a bus screams at us with its ear splitting high pitched horn, and the captain reacts toward the 100 ft. drop off into the river! So far so good, and the old reflexes will soon come back. The first weeks are the hardest, and these mountains are really really hard. We might have kept these mountains for the end of the trip when we are fit, but then the passes are snowed in; there is a typhoon¬†approaching the coast, and we might get it even now. Hope not.

We have taken a day off at 8.000 ft. to acclimatize, catch up on getting some protein in; you have no idea how hard it is to get good quality protein in the small villages, and our bodies are craving it. Last night we bought a can of some kind of strange fish with a very strong flavor, and some black beans mixed in; wonderful. We have boiled eggs for morning and a bunch of greasy (tasty) pastries for the climb.

We are getting into Tibetan prefectures and seeing the dress and features of the minority population. After a 13,000 plus pass tomorrow, they will no longer be the minority. We are already seeing prayer flags flying, and old women turning prayer wheels as they walk, men dressed in huge leather cloaks with cowboy style hats and daggers. Everyone is friendly, and the air is finally clear!

Here are a few photos from the last couple of days:

Lucky Studies His First Prayer Flags

Lucky Studies His First Prayer Flags

Corn Husking Party

Corn Husking Party

Market Day

Market Day

Our Constant Companions

Our Constant Companions

A Few Minutes We Were Pedaling Up That Switchback

A Few Minutes We Were Pedaling Up That Switchback

View From Our Binguan

View From Our Binguan

Buddhist Rock Paintings

Buddhist Rock Paintings

Food

Food


Comments

Into Tibetan Lands — 7 Comments

  1. Keep safe, Bob, Claire and Lucky! A lot of us remember you in our thoughts and prayers. By the way, what is the time difference and how do you deal with the time changes?
    Bonnie \o/

  2. Remarkable! Remarkable! Remarkable! It is mind boggling to us mortals what you two are doing. Best wishes for a continued safe journey and for acquiring the needed protein to sustain yourselves on this long, arduous trek. We love you guys.
    Dick & Helen

  3. Thanks for the encouragement. If anyone is on facebook, put a link on your site and tell your friends to do the same; also mention that we can’t access facebook while we are in China, so they won’t hear from us.

  4. I’m reading this at midnight, and happy that I had a big meal and will be relaxing in a comfortable bed after slouching around all day like a slug. You’ve made me remember to be grateful for the comfortable life. Thank you for being so energetic and sharing the adventure. Pictures are great. Food? YCHHHH!
    Bunny

  5. How I wish I could be with you on this fantastic trip, its totally awesome. I want to make a suggestion about some delicious items to eat for Chinese breakfast before you start your ride in the morning. I loved the simple food we ate as a child in Beijing, and have thought about it for all these many years. Three weeks ago when I went to Taipei I was able to satisfy all my cravings. I was so happy I felt like a child again.

    We eat porridge, which is rice mixed with vegetables, meat and seafood and cooked till it is soft and soupy. To accompany the porridge, many little side dishes are served. These dishes are called “shia fan” dishes, “shia fan” means to help the rice go down. These dishes consists of very inexpensive ingredients, like egg plant, bean curd, radishes, peanuts, cabbage, but seasoned so well with ginger, garlic, red peppers, sesame oil, hoisin or oyster sauce, that once you have eaten them, you will never forget how delicious they are.
    But we also eat “Shao Bing, Yiu Tiao”. “Shao Bing” is Chinese bread baked in many layers with sesame seeds on top. “Yiu Tiao” is a long piece of dough and deep fried. The “Yiu tiao” is then stuffed into the “Shao Bing” and eaten like a sandwich. The drink is usually soy milk.

    Be sure to make as many Chinese friends as poosible. The Chinese people have always loved Americans, and they will be happy to practice their English. Of course, I expect you to learn some Mandarin too. Now I want to wish you “Yi Lu Shun Feng” which means “Go with the Wind”

    Chi Newman

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