Highest Road in the World by Tandem Bicycle: into Central Asia and Return over the Great Himalaya Range

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Ride our tandem with us over the highest road pass in the world (18,380 feet) from South Asia into Central Asia. Pedal thirteen days across The Great Himalaya Range (passes to 17,558 feet) from exotic Tibetan Ladakh in the far north. Take a train to far south India and then bicycle with us from the Arabian Sea on the west to the Bay of Bengal on the east. Stories, photos, videos and music.

We hope you have enjoyed reading the reports of our progress and adventure on our India trip during 2014. All of our original blog articles are now organized in sequence as a complete web series on our adventure.

New Bohemians: 2014 INDIA TRIP

Yellow Parachute Test

Several years ago our friend, and inventor, Ed Rios made a prototype drag parachute for tandem use. His stoker, Jane, wisely refused to participate in the test, and of course we volunteered. Stoker Claire wore and deployed the chute which, after a bit of a jerk on deployment, worked to bring our speed to reasonable levels on a descent of Mt. Lemmon just outside of Tucson, Arizona. We loved it! It would need to be bigger for touring less smooth roads, but for day rides, perfect. Ed, how about making it double as a tent fly/tarp?

Capitalism and Happiness Half a World Away

I’m republishing this video from 2009 from our In Search of Shangrila journey. Public discourse about economics, and Capitalism in particular, is distorted by a lack of depth about just what constitutes both. By removing politics, and expanding the conversation to include the people who do the real work of the World’s economic production, we expand our understanding of just how much we share.

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The Wall Street Banker creates wealth with Ones and Zeros on a computer, the vendor at this market in Kampong Chong, Cambodia, creates wealth with sweat and skill. Both seek the same thing, a better life for themselves and their families. Is one superior? Who is happier? Is the pursuit of happiness worthy of being included, and measured, in the world of economics? After traveling 43,000 plus miles around the World at 12 miles per hour on a bicycle, I think it is a worthy goal. Maybe we might just find the vendor is Kampong Chong is just as fulfilled, happy, as the Wall Street Banker. If so how would that change our economic policies?

What do you think?