Top of The World; Kerala and Tamil Nadu Too

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Ride our tandem with us over the highest road pass in the world (18,380 feet) from South Asia into Central Asia. Pedal thirteen days across The Great Himalaya Range (passes to 17,558 feet) from exotic Tibetan Ladakh in the far north. Take a train to far south India and then bicycle with us from the Arabian Sea on the west to the Bay of Bengal on the east. Stories, photos, videos and music.

We hope you have enjoyed reading the reports of our progress and adventure on our India trip during 2014. All of our original blog articles are now organized in sequence as a complete web series on our adventure.

New Bohemians: 2014 INDIA TRIP

Ken Steinhoff; Photographer, Story-teller, Road-warrior

Ken Steinhoff and I worked as photojournalists at the Athens Messenger in the late 1960’s. He stayed in the newspaper business, but got bumped up to a desk jockey job, I went on to other things. In retirement Ken went back to what he loves most, telling stories about people, places and history. He posts most of these at http://www.capecentralhigh.com/ We recently got together in Athens and spent a day driving around Southeast Ohio, trying to remember sites of some of our old stories, and catching up. Ken’s new van resembles the Volkswagen Squareback he wore out on those same roads. The only difference is it’s fitted with the latest in digital equipment instead of short wave and scanners and the best digital cameras. Oh, and there is more of the driver, and he has less hair than I remember. I’ve aged my share too. Ken has projects planned to keep him busy for the next forty-five years. I hope the road warrior has as many years as he needs. He does really good work. Check out that site.DSCF0527

The New Bohemians in Jefferson’s Garden

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When visiting Monticello most visitors crowd together tightly, with twenty others, for a view of the main floor of the house and call it good. We of course spent most of our time in the gardens. We had our own personal guide and had an audience with the chief gardener, who answered the few questions our guide was unable to answer. We had no schedule, no groups awaited our departure, and we had the space to absorb all that we’d learned about the creative, scientific garden experiments of perhaps our favorite Founding Father.

If you visit Monticello, do take the house tour, but leave a couple of hours for the orchards and gardens. They give as much insight into the mind of Thomas Jefferson than his eclectic approach to architecture. The man who wrote our Declaration of Independence was a scientific thinker, and that should tell us something about how we should guide the future of the Republic.